I use many of the best cutting edge lasers and light devices in my office every day. However, I am the first person to talk my melasma patients out of using these devices, and opting for less expensive options instead. This blog focuses on why! 

If you have melasma, when you first get a laser or light based treatment, you might see the brown patches turn into a coffee ground material, and then slough off. At first, the results look great! However, the next time you go in the sun, you might notice your melasma comes back with a vengeance. I can’t tell you how many patients have come to me in tears after getting a series of laser or IPL (intense pulsed light) treatments at a spa, and realizing that they spent thousands of dollars only to find that their melasma is worse than it ever was.  

Here’s why that happens. We know that melanocytes, the pigment producing cells, are exquisitely sensitive to both heat and light. Consequently, it seems as though most laser and light devices, even used at very low/gentle settings, prime or sensitize the melanocytes. The next time these cells are exposed to sunlight or heat, they work overtime to pump out more pigment. As a dermatologist, on behalf of my patients, I’d rather be safe than sorry. Although every melasma patient would love a quick fix, and laser before and after photos can provide that WOW they are looking for, I strongly urge you to see a provider who takes a more conservative (and often less expensive) route.  

Now if you have sun damage, and your brown spots are lentigos, or sun spots, and NOT melasma, that’s a whole different story! Bring on the lasers and lights! In those cases, I absolutely love using lasers like the Fraxel laser to brighten dark spots from the sun. So, the very first and more important step is to make sure the person deciding on your treatment plan has a very good eye and knows how to diagnose disorders of pigmentation.

I’m sharing so much on melasma right here for you guys and I love the questions you have been asking. Check out my latest posts on my favorite skincare ingredients and products to address melasma and my thoughts on the safety of hydroquinone, a topical treatment often used to treat melasma.

Dr. Whitney

I’ve been getting so many questions about which skincare ingredients are most effective when dealing with melasma, or the type of hyperpigmentation known as the “pregnancy mask.” 

Overall, the strategic combination of complementary ingredients to target different aspects of melasma is, in my opinion, the best approach. Here’s why: some ingredients slow down pigment production, while others stop the transfer of pigment from the melanin producing cells to the other cells in the skin. Other ingredients help exfoliate away the uppermost layers of pigment-stained skin, and others act as antioxidants, neutralizing the free radicals and oxidative stress that makes melasma worse. So, combinations are going to be more effective than single modalities.

But, it’s a delicate balance because we don’t want to overdo it with potentially irritating ingredients. If you cause too much irritation in the skin, this can make melasma worse. 

In this post, I’ll cover both products you can get online or in stores, and ingredients that come in prescription strength, through your doctor. I’ve put together a list of the ingredients I find most effective in addressing melasma, and of course, I’ve added products in each category that I love to use:

Glycolic acid and/or lactic acid: 

While in office peels are going to get you more dramatic results more quickly, you can absolutely see improvements using at home peels if you use them right! 

First, look for ingredients like glycolic acid and lactic acid. If you have oily skin, you might enjoy a peel with salicylic acid, but that can be drying in more sensitive, dry skin types.

The peels you purchase online or over the counter, that are meant for at home use, tend to be much weaker than in office peels. However, you can still run into trouble. At home peels contain many of the same ingredients as in-office peels, so they do come with a risk of burn or skin irritation if used improperly.

Despite what the instructions say, the first time you use one of these at home peels, consider leaving it on for 5 minutes and then rinsing off, and immediately applying a moisturizer – this is the recommendation I make to my patients. This short exposure is a “test run” for your skin to see how you tolerate that peel. Another good rule of thumb is that tingling is ok, but stinging/burning is NOT ok.  If you feel anything more than a tingle, then wash it off immediately and apply a nourishing moisturizer. Burning does NOT mean it’s working- it means it’s triggering too much inflammation in your skin and that can make your melanocytes react by pumping out MORE pigment.  

If your skin feels healthy and you don’t experience any stinging/burning or red blotches in the days following the first peel trial, then you can consider leaving the product on the skin either for 10 minutes, or even overnight, depending on the strength of the product and how sensitive your skin tends to be. The goal is to try to work your way up to using one of these products twice a week at night, with each application spaced 3-4 nights apart.  

Some of my favorite at home peels are:

Moon Juice Acid Potion Resurfacing Exfoliator: (glycolic, lactic and salicylic acid)

Skin Fix Correct+ Dark Spot Corrector: (glycolic acid and lactic acid) 

Herbivore Botanicals Prism 12% Exfoliating Serum: (lactic, glycolic, and malic acids)

Vit C and other antioxidants (turmeric, Vitamin E, honey)

Cover FX Brightening Booster Drops (these drops have an oil soluble derivative of vitamin C called Ascorbyl Tetraisopalmitate.  It’s one of the most stable forms of vitamin C and stability is critical for vitamin C because it is prone to oxidation)  

Skinceuticals CE Ferulic with 15% L-ascorbic acid. (Strong science behind this one, but note that it is expensive)

Bakuchiol (a retinol alternative)

Check out my full blog post on this topic HERE.

Other topical ingredients to consider: azeleic acid, kojic acid, niacinamide, licorice root extract, mulberry extract and tranexamic acid, arbutin and soy. Licorice root seems to be more soothing, while niacinamide can cause irritation in some people. Topical tranexamic acid can sometimes help, but can also cause some irritation. Topical use is much less effective than when I prescribe tranexamic acid orally (more on this immediately below).

Turning to Prescription strength topical ingredients to address melasma:

In my office, I’ll often compound or blend my own prescription strength ingredients for my melasma patients.  Oftentimes, these products combine tretinoin or tazorac (forms of prescription strength vit A) with hydroquinone. Hydroquinone is a controversial ingredient with some very real side effects, so I strongly discourage anyone from using this ingredient if they are not under the direct supervision of a dermatologist. I have an entire post on the safety of hydroquinone here.  I talk about the risks and benefits of these treatments with my patients, and customize my approach for each patient based on their pigment pattern, medical history, budget and comfort level.

For info on how to address your melasma from the inside out through diet and supplements, check back soon!

Dr. Whitney

 

Melasma, and hyperpigmentation in general, is one of the most common reasons people schedule an appointment with a dermatologist. Below, I’ll talk all about one of the most powerful topical ingredients we use to treat melasma, hydroquinone, and the safety concerns surrounding its use. 

Okay, let’s dive into the topic at hand: just how SAFE is hydroquinone?

Hydroquinone is one of the most powerful topical ingredients when it comes to brightening dark spots, treating melasma, combatting hyperpigmentation and evening out skin tone. It’s available both as a prescription, often found in combination with other prescription medications like tretinoin, and is also available in OTC (over the counter) products. While it’s an incredibly powerful ingredient, and often considered first line by most dermatologists in the treatment of melasma, there are safety concerns surrounding its use. Does it get absorbed into the bloodstream? Can it cause cancer? Can it damage your liver? Should I be afraid to use it?  Having researched this ingredient extensively, and having used it in the office for over a decade, I will give you my honest opinion here.

First, should you be afraid of systemic absorption, and possible risks associated with systemic absorption? Many people aren’t aware that they are being exposed to considerable amounts of hydroquinone in their diet every single day. Hydroquinone is found in nature as either hydroquinone or arbutin, which is converted into hydroquinone in the body.  Hydroquinone and arbutin are found in tea, coffee, pears, wheat bread and red wine. Studies show that human exposure to hydroquinone from our diet is significant https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8568910/  I personally consume coffee and tea every day, and I love enjoying a juicy, ripe pear as a healthy snack.  

Does hydroquinone cause cancer or damage the liver? Most of these studies were done in rats, and many were done on populations of rats that already had predispositions for growing certain cancers and tumors. Although I certainly am not going to ignore these concerning studies, it is very hard to make a convincing case that what we see in rats will translate into humans. As far as liver studies go, hydroquinone seems to actually have a slight protective effect when you look at risk for liver cancers in rats. So clearly, we really are not certain of the true impact that hydroquinone has on our different organs. So far, studies done in humans who are exposed to higher concentrations of hydroquinone have been reassuring. I honestly don’t know any board certified dermatologists in the US who are afraid to use this ingredient because of concerns surrounding its “toxicity” to the body, after having reviewed the literature and science extensively.

What we do know is that high concentrations of topical hydroquinone, especially used for long periods of time without a doctor’s supervision, can lead to a skin condition called exogenous ochronosis, or pseudo ochronosis.  

This is when we see a darkening of the skin, even darker than the original melasma that these creams were meant to treat!  Furthermore, it is near impossible to get these stains to disappear!  

These cases, thankfully, are quite rare in the United States, and much more commonly found in parts of the world where people are also using antimalarial medications. Antimalarials also cause pseudo ochronosis, so the combination of hydroquinone plus antimalarials are probably a major risk factor for this condition.

The main risks seem to be: 

using concentrations higher than 4%

using hydroquinone for years at a time without breaks, and

combining hydroquinone with other ingredients such as oral antimalarial medications.  

We also know that many “bleaching” and “whitening” creams that you can find online or in other countries are contaminated with mercury and high potency steroids like clobetasol https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0013935116302651

Ok, so how do I approach hydroquinone in my office with my patients.  Here are my take homes:

  • Hydroquinone should only be used under the very strict supervision of a dermatologist
  • Each patient needs to weigh pros and cons, risks and benefits of using hydroquinone vs using other treatment modalities.  In cases where melasma is severe and affecting someone’s quality of life, the benefits may outweigh the risks. It’s a personal decision between that patient and the treating physician.
  • If you have been prescribed a hydroquinone containing prescription from your dermatologist, you MUST follow up carefully. Most derms will rotate you off of hydroquinone every few months, to make sure you get prolonged breaks between uses.
  • If you have used hydroquinone, or are using it, under the close supervision of a dermatologist, don’t lose sleep over it! Remember, everyone who is drinking coffee or tea, or eating pears or sipping on red wine, is also being exposed to hydroquinone.
  • Do NOT try to get hydroquinone containing products online or through online pharmacies.  If a friend brings you an extra “magic cream” across the border and swears by it, PASS!  Warn your friend about mercury and clobetasol and other risks she/he might not even know about.

For more recommendations and discussions surrounding melasma and hyperpigmentation, check out my IGTV and YouTube channels.

Dr. Whitney

 

 

Now that the warm summer months are becoming a distant memory for many of us, one major focus in my office is on hyperpigmentation that’s still lingering on my patients’ skin into the winter months. Specifically, melasma, also called the “pregnancy mask”, is common and can be incredibly frustrating. 

Melasma is a type of hyperpigmentation which is characterized by dark brown or gray-brown patches of skin on your cheeks, forehead, upper lip, or along the lower cheeks and jawline. My patients often describe it as having the appearance of “paint splatter” on their skin.  The excess pigment can be in the upper layers of your skin, or the deeper layers, or both. If you have excess pigment in the deeper layers, that can be much more challenging to treat.

A question I’ve been getting all the time on this subject is: Should I use retinol or bakuchiol if I have melasma?

Whereas retinol can be a bit of a diva in that it can be an irritant. Anyone who has tried a retinol has been there: you use it liberally for a few nights in a row and think: “No big deal! What’s all the fuss? My skin is doing fine.”  Then, about 4-5 days in, you find your regular moisturizer that you use all the time is making you red, blotchy and stings like crazy when you apply it. Then, you start to see the flakes, and you officially have a full blown case of “retinoid dermatitis!”

The new kid on the block, bakuchiol, is not irritating in the same way, and has been found to actually help soothe irritated skin!  When compared to retinol, bakuchiol is also very effective at reducing hyperpigmentation. This is so important because we know that irritation can actually exacerbate your melasma, making it worse. So although retinoids are so great at lightning the skin, it was always a delicate balance between getting the benefits without creating inflammation which we know could set melasma patients back.  

Now, we don’t have the same mountain of evidence for bakuchiol as we do for retinol because bakuchiol is so new on the scene, but the studies I’ve seen have been very, very promising and exciting on this front.

Also, bakuchiol is a great option for hyperpigmentation/melasma patients because it is not photosensitizing, meaning it won’t make your skin more susceptible to sun damage. Many retinol products, in contrast, are best used at night because they can make your skin more sensitive to the sun. 

Third, bakuchiol acts as an antioxidant, which is very beneficial for melasma patients given that oxidative stress and free radicals contribute to melasma. 

Finally, pregnancy and nursing often coincide with melasma (also known as the “pregnancy mask”), but we do not recommend use of retinol if you are pregnant or nursing. So, bakuchiol is a great option to help dial down melasma while you are pregnant or nursing. 

Here are some of my favorite bakuchiol products: 

Herbivore Botanicals Bakuchiol Retinol Alternative Serum-very lightweight, easily layers under your moisturizer.

Beauty Counter Countertime Tripeptide Radiance Serum 

You guys have asked so many great questions about melasma, so keep ‘em coming!

 

Dr. Whitney

Cellulite is one of those topics that dermatologists find frustrating.  We are very solution driven, and up until now, there haven’t been many effective long term solutions for cellulite.  All the creams and gadgets out there claiming to help with cellulite are more hype than reality, and the in-office procedures that actually work have been, for the most part, somewhat invasive to the point that most patients are turned off by the process.

So, you can imagine, I was pretty pumped to learn about a new FDA approved injectable treatment for cellulite… yes, an injection, similar to Botox and Dysport, injections I do all day long… that can be done in the office and dramatically improve the appearance of cellulite.

Caveat: Whenever things are new, they tend to be hyped up and marketing tends to focus on all the good without doing justice to the bad.  We also tend to learn about the downside of procedures long after they launch… sometimes it takes a full year or more to really assess the real life efficacy and safety of a new treatment.

That being said, this is pretty exciting! Let’s break it down together.

First, some groundwork. What is cellulite? 

There’s a major misconception out there that cellulite is caused by diet or lack of exercise.  That’s totally not the case- stop blaming yourself for your cellulite!

Cellulite is caused by the outpouching of fat lobules under the skin.  So we have a layer of fat under the skin, and there are bands of collagen called septae that attach the skin to the underlying layer of fascia.  So imagine a sort of sandwich—the skin on top, the fascia on the bottom.  These fibrous septae run up and down and tether the two together.  Where the septae tug on the skin, that’s where you see a dimple. In between the dimples are bulges of fat pooching up (protrusions of fat). So you’re left with an uneven surface.  There are some shadows and some bulges.  That’s cellulite. These fibrous septae are oriented differently in women as compared to men, so almost ALL women get cellulite whereas lass than 10% of men get it. About 9 out of 10 women have cellulite, and it affects women of all races and ethnicities and all shapes and sizes. Yes, you can be thin, muscular, in great shape and still have cellulite!

Why do we care?

Cellulite can have a major impact on self-esteem and confidence. And no surprise here: we blame ourselves!  Studies show that the majority of women are convinced it’s THEIR FAULT they have cellulite!

What can we do about it and what is Qwo? 

Yes, there are topical treatments and devices that can temporarily improve the treatment of cellulite.  Any time you boost circulation to the area, or any topical ingredients that stimulate blood flow or help to thicken the dermal layer of the skin can make the area look better.  The thing is that most creams and lotions on the market, and most at home devices, only give you a temporary improvement.  If they do create lasting changes, those results are very subtle.

So what’s Qwo?  It’s the first FDA approved injectable for cellulite. It just got FDA approval for moderate to severe cellulite in the buttocks of adult women. Will we end up using it off label for the thighs or the arms?  Maybe!  It’s still super early so that remains to be seen.

Qwo uses an enzyme called collagenase that targets types 1 and 3 collagen, so it basically eats away at or dissolves those fibrous collagen bands tethering the skin down.  I think it’s so interesting how we are trying to fight these types of collagen degrading enzymes in the skin, face and neck, but when it comes to cellulite, we want them to chew away at the collagen.  You can see the collagen band dissolving in the images below:

The trials to evaluate Qwo are the largest cellulite studies every conducted with 845 participants, and I REALLY love that about a third of the participants have skin of color.  So many procedures are only studies on white skin, and that’s not ok.  Darker skin types have different reactions- especially things like hyperpigmentation- that need to be carefully studied so we, dermatologists, can counsel those patients appropriately about the possible risks and side effects.

So what are the risks?

So far we’re seeing mainly tenderness, bruising, some discoloration which I’m SURE will be more common in skin of color, and of course swelling. This is probably a treatment you’re not going to want to do during the summer because a bruise in the buttock or thigh area can last up to 3 weeks and bruising seems to be pretty common. The protocol involved about 3 rounds of injections, spaced 3-4 weeks apart.

Cost?  Big question mark!  We shall see when it becomes commercially available—the thought is probably Spring 2021.

The studies are still ongoing to assess how long the results will last and to assess long term safety.

So what’s my take home?

I am very excited by the photos and clinical results I’ve seen thus far. It seems to be very effective even for severe cellulite. Here are some images the company shared with me:

I like that it’s an injectable.  I consider myself an expert injector, and I feel right at home with a syringe in my hand.  I can’t imagine incorporating this into my practice will be a challenge whatsoever from a skill and technique standpoint.

I like that it’s getting to the underlying root of the problem- the septae.  It has the potential to truly deliver long term results- we’re talking years if not permanent.

I’m worried about the cost—I suspect this will be pretty pricey, especially since there isn’t a competitor on the market yet in this space. Hopefully other companies will come out with competitive molecules, but until then, these guys are going to corner the market and that always leads to high prices.

Side effects: we need to really asses how severe the swelling, bruising and tenderness are, and how often it leads to hyperpigmentation – and how long it takes for those dark spots to lighten up.  My patients with skin of color who suffer from hyperpigmentation after a bug bite or scratch or pimple sometimes find the stain left over for months is worse than what caused it in the first place.

Stay tuned! I promise to update you guys on this as new info comes out.  For now, stick with self-tanners and cellulite creams and a cute skirt or flattering shorts!  And, please stop blaming yourself if you have cellulite.  WE ALL DO.  You’re in good company.

Check out my video with more info right here!

Dr. Whitney

The subject of how our diet impacts the health of our skin has been incredibly important to me. I’ve been very vocal about this subject – even writing a book centered around the GUT-BRAIN-SKIN axis called The Beauty of Dirty Skin.

However, many dermatologists have remained skeptical about this connection because they felt that the data wasn’t strong enough to convince them to change their practice.  A new study, just out in JAMA, may finally change that.

This large, robust, epidemiological study AGAIN shows that adult acne is, indeed, associated with high glycemic index (e.g. sugary) foods and beverages as well as dairy milk.  Those findings appear consistent with prior studies as well, so this didn’t come as a surprise to me!

With the trending term “Maskne,” and all the stress we’ve been living with over the last few months, conversations about acne have hit a record high in my practice and in my direct message inbox on Instagram.  Adult acne, in particular, has been increasing in prevalence over the years, and it can really take a toll on quality of life, self-esteem and confidence.

Most observational studies to date looking at the link between diet on acne look back (retrospective design), this one looks forward.  It has what’s called a prospective design.  That prospective design, combined with the very large number of people involved (over 24,000 participants), and the wide number of dietary factors taking into account, makes these results hard to ignore.

As someone who sees the powerful effect of acne on lives every day, I firmly believe that educating patients on these associations between their diet and their skin are helping way more than hurting.  I personally don’t feel the need for a large scale clinical trial to further prove these associations. I believe if we keep waiting for “perfect” studies to be done, we will end up with many more emotional, and physical scars that could have been avoided through simple, accessible changes.

 

Why Alcohol in your Hand Sanitizers is NOT the Same as Alcohol in your Toner

As a doctor and a scientist, I know that alcohol can be a lifesaving ingredient in certain scenarios, but it can do harm in others.  Alcohol use in skincare products requires some serious thought. Here’s what you need to know when it comes to alcohol in your skincare products.

For your face: 

Not all alcohols are created equal.  Alcohols fall into 2 main categories: drying alcohols, and hydrating alcohols.  When it comes to products you use on your face, you want to avoid drying alcohols, but welcome the use of hydrating alcohols.

Drying alcohols are often listed on labels as SD alcohol, denatured alcohol, ethyl alcohol or isopropyl alcohol.  These are lightweight, volatile alcohols, meaning they evaporate quickly off the surface of the skin.  The problem is, these types of alcohols do major damage to the natural lipids and fatty acids on the surface of your skin, so they damage your skin barrier.  For people with oily skin, they can give you a sensation of feeling like you’re degreasing the skin and drying out the oil, but the long term damaging effects far outweigh that temporary sensation.  In fact, over time, your skin will actually pump out more oils to compensate for the stripping and drying effects these alcohols have.  So, long story short, these types of alcohols should be avoided by people of ALL skin types when it comes to their facial skin.

Hydrating alcohols, or fatty alcohols, are actually excellent ingredients when it comes to facial skincare!  Examples include cetyl, stearyl and cetearyl alcohol.  These alcohols are emollients, meaning they keep skin hydrated and supple—yes, the exact opposite of what you might expect when you see the word “alcohol” on the label!

For your hands:

Hand sanitizers that contain 60% ethyl alcohol and  70% isopropanol are incredibly effective germ killers, meaning they can kill many disease causing bacteria and viruses within seconds.  These are the kinds of alcohols I warned you to avoid in your facial skincare, but when faced with a virus like COVID-19, the benefits currently outweigh the risks when using them in your hand sanitizers. Just be sure to only use them when you don’t have access to running soap and water, and moisturize as often as possible to restore those lipids and encourage the regrowth of healthy bacteria (your microbiome).

Dr. Whitney

So many people are breaking out right now.  Combine the “maskne” from the friction and moisture rubbing against our skin with the chronic stress many of us are experiencing, and blemishes are popping up all over so many beautiful faces.  Acne won’t kill us, but it can certainly impact a good Zoom or Facetime!

Here’s a key tip when it comes to avoiding breakouts: try to reach for ingredients that are what we call “non comedogenic,” meaning they will not clog your pores.  As you guys know, I’m all about going CLEAN, so here are some clean ingredients that are BOWE GLOW approved and won’t break you out, followed by some natural sounding ingredients that are almost guaranteed to clog your pores:

BOWE GLOW APPROVED OILS & BUTTERS

Some of my favorite non comedogenic oils and butters that will NOT clog the pores are

  • Argan Oil
  • Jojoba Oil
  • Safflower Seed Oil
  • Rosehip Seed Oil
  • Shea Butter
  • Mango Butter
  • Raspberry Seed Oil
  • Hemp Seed Oil
  • Prickly Pear Seed Oil
  • Camelina Oil
  • Watermelon Seed Oil

LIMIT using on your FACE (and other acne prone areas like your chest or upper back) if you are breaking out:

  • Coconut oil
  • Wheat germ oil
  • Palm kernel oil
  • Linseed oil
  • Cocoa Butter

I have much more on this topic to share very soon!

Dr. Whitney

You guys know I’m always reading the most cutting edge scientific studies that give me insight into living your healthiest life, and when your body is healthy, your skin is healthy!

The most exciting new science that has caught my attention surrounds a new way to approach food: The Circadian Rhythm Diet. Skin health, and our overall health, is not just about WHAT we eat — of equal importance is WHEN we eat.   Timing our meals first gained momentum with intermittent fasting, but the Circadian Rhythm Diet takes the science to a whole new level, and at its core is our exposure to BLUE LIGHT.

Humans have evolved to be highly sensitive to the 24-hour solar cycle.  We all have an internal clock that controls almost every biological system in our bodies, from our sleep-wake cycles to our mood, to our immune strength, our metabolism and our cellular health- yes, even our skin’s health.  The most important thing that sets our circadian rhythm, or sets our internal clock, is our exposure to NATURAL SUNLIGHT.

In the past, we rose with the sun, ate during daylight hours, and then rested and fasted when the sun set.  In fact, when our eyes perceive blue light, it tells our brain to shut down production of our sleep hormone, melatonin. It sets our internal clock to WAKE UP!  We need the sun’s bright blue light in the morning to become alert and active, and we need dark, or at least the absence of blue light, to jump-start our brain’s, and consequently our skin’s, sleep mode and recovery.

Now, we find ourselves totally MESSING with our internal clock as a result of using screens late that emit stimulating blue light rays. We’re tricking our brains into thinking it’s still daytime, and we delay our production of melatonin, impair our sleep, and mess up our health.  What else are you doing while you check emails or watch Netflix at night?  You snack.  Most of us eat a late dinner, oftentimes after sunset, and we snack until we finally pass out, way after our ancestors did when they followed natural light patterns in the sky.

When intermittent fasting became popular, people started to recognize that it’s not just WHAT we eat, but WHEN we eat is just as important when to comes to health. Now, we can take that one step further with Circadian Rhythm Diet.

Mounting evidence says that if you want to optimize your weight, your metabolism, your overall health, and of course, your skin health, you should try syncing up your mealtimes with the natural cycles of light.

Calories seem to be metabolized BETTER in the morning, and eating after dark jolts the brain into thinking it’s daytime and can disrupt the healthy circadian rhythm that is so critical for our health, including our skin health. As we know, beauty sleep is real! Sleep is a necessary phase of profound regeneration for the skin. While we rest, our skin cells are renewing, regenerating, and restoring themselves – and so is our entire body. Our immune system needs this quiet time to stay in peak condition.

If you want to try to take your health and wellness to the next level, give this a try:

  • Eat while it’s light, and limit what you eat during hours when it is dark.
  • Eat a heavier breakfast, a medium sized lunch, and a lighter dinner.
  • The earlier your dinner, the better. Try not to wait too long after the sun sets to eat.
  • After dinner, try to limit the amount you eat.

Craving info on relevant studies? Check out these links:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3756673/

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-10/05/c_138448870.htm

https://www.technologynetworks.com/cell-science/news/meal-timing-can-make-or-break-your-cells-circadian-rhythm-318644

Dr. Whitney

 

 

 

Hydration is KEY to healthy skin, but so many people are confused about what the skin actually needs to stay hydrated.  Here are my top 10 tips to keeping skin hydrated:

TIP #1:  Water is good, but water infused with antioxidants is better! Check out one of my favorite detox water recipes here!

TIP #2: On average, women should drink at least 2 L per day, men need at least 3 L per day.

TIP #3: UP your intake if you exercise, if you eat a diet high in protein, or if you live in a warm or dry climate!

TIP #4: Eat some of your water by munching on fiber rich veggies. They will not only boost your water intake, but keep you regular and keep your gut healthy. As you know, a healthy gut = healthy skin!  Fun fact: spinach is almost 100% water by weight!

TIP #5: Yes coffee counts! Contrary to popular belief, coffee and tea can boost overall hydration in the body.

TIP #6: Avoid added sugars. Read the label. If you see more than 3g of sugar per serving, PASS! Beware of so called “energy” drinks, and lattes and cappuccinos that taste a little TOO good.

TIP #7: Seal that moisture in your skin by layering a serum under a moisturizer morning and night. Check out some of my favorite products here!

TIP #8: Prevent overnight evaporation by using a cool mist humidifier in your bedroom.

TIP #9: Add a weekly hydrating sheet mask like this one  to seal extra moisture in the skin.

TIP #10: Check your urine. If it’s clear or light yellow, you’re on the right track! Sorry guys, I AM a doctor. Had to go there.

So cheers to staying hydrated!

Dr. Whitney

@DrWhitneyBowe

Instagram

Sign up to get FREE ACCESS to my TWO EXCLUSIVE eBOOKS: (1) My Top Sunscreen Picks for 2020 and (2) My Signature BOWE GLOW BOOTCAMP to jump start your healthy glow today!

This site offers health, wellness, fitness and nutritional information for educational purposes only. The information on this website is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

© 2019 - Dr. Whitney Bowe

Terms of Use

Join my email community

Become a Bowe Glow Insider! Sign up to have access to exclusive news, VIP product giveaways and events, and early access to glowing skin tips and videos!

Sign up to get FREE ACCESS to my exclusive BOWE GLOW BOOTCAMP e-book to JUMP START YOUR HEALTHY GLOW TODAY!