January 16, 2019Skincare

Baby Facials for Children: A Fun Treat or Forget It

I love bonding with my 7 year old daughter, Maclane, and planning special activities together. We might take a mommy and me yoga class, go out to lunch, or get a manicure together as a treat for a special occasion like a birthday or wedding!

I have been getting a lot of questions this week about the safety of child facials or “baby facials” after a photo of Harper Beckham receiving this type of facial was shared on social media.

First, Is a “Baby Facial” Safe?

Children naturally have lots of collagen and hyaluronic acid in their skin, so their skin is naturally more smooth and plump than adult skin. However, they are more prone to absorbing ingredients rubbed onto their skin than adults due to a number of factors including their high surface area-to-volume ratio and immature drug metabolism systems. This can present safety concerns depending upon the type of products and ingredients used during the facial.

Additionally, some facials can use products that make the skin more sensitive to the sun. Given that children spend more time playing outdoors and are not as diligent with sunscreen, this is something to consider when providing consent for a facial treatment. Furthermore, sun damage during childhood can have especially serious consequences when it comes to skin cancer risk down the road.

And – some facials involve extractions. If those extractions are too aggressive, it could bruise, break a blood vessel, or leave a permanent “ice pick” scar in the skin.

Finally, children are generally not as careful around steam and boiling water so depending on the facial, there could be a risk of being burned.

My Opinion on “Baby Facials”

From my clinical experience (and life experience), children can be very susceptible to comments made about their skin and appearance. A well-meaning practitioner might begin a treatment by pointing out an “area of concern” or identifying “problem areas” in the skin. I would hesitate to expose my daughter unnecessarily to these types of comments given the impact they could potentially have upon her emotional well-being and self-esteem.

In my opinion, if Mac really wanted to experience a “baby facial” specifically geared toward children which involves pampering and positivity and some natural, clean skincare products, I don’t think it can hurt. On the flip side, if she feels like we are treating an “issue”, addressing a “problem”, or if she thinks she “needs” this to be beautiful/healthy, then I would most likely believe that the risk outweighs the benefit.